GNOCCHI DI PATATE

mercoledì 25 novembre 2015



On saturday night me and Livio went to sleep telling each other "okay so tomorrow we'll make some gnocchi, goodnight love". 
So that's what we did on a sunday morning, including flour all over the kitchen and boiled potatoes so hot we kind of burned our fingers. But it was worth it. 
We also reached a point, during the preparation, where we had to decide which shape we were going to give to our gnocchi. And because we have very often different opinions and couldn't make up our minds we did both. 
So he went for the 'finger technique' with which you lightly roll your index finger on top of the gnocco and then press gently to form a little indentation that will later on collect the tomato sauce or any other sauce you're going to use. 
I went for the 'fork technique' and used the fork as a slide practically. With the tines facing upwards, slightly roll the gnocco along the tines towards their tips. You will end up with a deep indentation on one side and a ridged surface on the other. 

There really is no best way to do it and it was nice to find different types of gnocchi in the plate.

The recipe itself is really simple and trust me if I say that after tasting homemade gnocchi, you'll never go back to the ready made ones. 
I don't know what it is about gnocchi that scared me for a while. 
When ever I thought about making fresh ones at home I would end up telling myself it was too much of a hard job.
But it turned out to be extremely simple and plus you only need two even more simple ingredients that we all have in our house: flour and potatoes.
Some may tell you to add an egg to the dough to help it come together but I firmly believe in the purist version of homemade gnocchi, which is: 'solo patate e farina' (only flour and potatoes).


Gnocchi di patate

Serves 5 generously

potatoes (such as Kennebec, Majestic or Russy), 1 kg
plain flour, 400 g  
coarse salt, a handful

Note: it is important that you boil the potatoes with their skin because by removing it they would easily break in the boiling pan and we don't want that to happen.

Start by washing off any soil from the potatoes then put them in a large pan and cover with water.
Add a handful of coarse salt and start cooking on a high flame for about 45 minutes. Depending on the size of the potatoes this could take shorter or longer but you will know that they're cooked when you can easily insert a fork in the potatoes. If you feel even a little bit of resistance then leave them to cook a little longer, but don't reach the point where they brake.
Now you can drain the potatoes and start peeling them while they're still hot. Mash the potatoes with a masher and transfer on a clean surface.
Now little by little add the flour and work the dough. It will seem fragmented at the beginning but once the potatoes start to cool down everything will come together.
Once the ingredients are evenly mixed dust your hand with some flour and tear off a piece of dough the size of a tennis ball. Roll the dough in a 1,5 cm thick sausage and then start cutting small rectangles (1 cm wide) with a knife. Once you have a table filled with small rectangles you can start shaping the gnocchi.
You can choose between the 'finger technique' or the 'fork technique' or you can do both, as we did.

Finger techniquelightly roll your index finger on top of the gnocco and then press gently to form a little indentation that will later on collect the tomato sauce or any other sauce you're going to use. 


Fork technique: Place a fork with the tines facing upwards and slightly roll the gnocco along the tines towards their tips. You will end up with a deep indentation on one side and a ridged surface on the other. 


Bring a large pan of water to a boil and quickly transfer the gnocchi inside. They will be cooked when they start floating, no exact time.

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